UNOS research: Insights from the American Transplant Congress
Photos of UNOS researchers who presented findings at ATC with aim of improving national transplant system

Insights: FEATURE

UNOS research: Insights from the American Transplant Congress

UNOS scientists presented research related to the impact of COVID-19 on donation and transplant, DCD heart utilization, and improving equity in access.

As the joint annual meeting of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, the American Transplant Congress has always served as a critical forum for researchers to discuss the latest lifesaving breakthroughs in organ donation and transplant science. Transplant professionals from around the globe participate in the event every year to learn about cutting edge research. With more than 110,000 people waiting for an organ, the cumulative work of UNOS researchers plays a key role in how the community evaluates system impacts of various policy and operational changes.

2021 UNOS research

​29 United Network for Organ Sharing staff members authored or co-authored studies to present at the 2021 American Transplant Congress, which was held virtually June 4-9.

The work presented by UNOS researchers this year addressed a broad spectrum of transplant-related issues, ranging from improving equity in access, the impact of COVID-19 on donation and transplant, and analyses regarding the impact of policy.

Improving the transplant system through research and analytics

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Additional research

2020 UNOS research

UNOS scientists presented research on behavioral science, equity in access and impact of organ policy changes.

Originally published Jul. 8, 2020

Between May 30 and June 3, more than two dozen UNOS researchers presented their data-driven studies aimed at discovering innovations that improve the U.S. organ donation and transplantation system.

“Our presentations at ATC demonstrate the breadth of knowledge and skills on our team, as well as the varied research approaches we take to study the national system,” Carrico said.

Read more from 2020

As the joint annual meeting of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, the American Transplant Congress has always served as a forum where researchers discuss the latest lifesaving breakthroughs in organ donation and transplant science. This year was no different, except that rather than convening at a conference center, thousands of transplant professionals from around the world met virtually in online sessions where they presented on the most recent research unfolding in the organ donation and transplant community.

“Even with ATC happening virtually this year, the UNOS team was able to present our research on the U.S. transplant system to the conference’s international audience,” said Bob Carrico, Ph.D., United Network for Organ Sharing director of research. “Our work offers the unique perspective of studying the entire system—including how it is affected by policy changes and public health trends—as well as studying the effects of user interactions with the system.”

Improving the organ transplant system through research and analytics

The work UNOS researchers presented at the conference involved a spectrum of organ transplant-related issues, ranging from improving equity in access to transplants to analyzing the impact of policy changes on organ donation trends and examining the potential for behavioral science to help predict transplant outcomes. Topics presented at the 2020 conference included:

 

“There is so much intellectual capital assembled at UNOS to study and evaluate the transplant system and find ways to improve through research and analytics,” said UNOS chief growth officer Ryan Ehrensberger, Ph.D. “Being able to share these insights and learn with the international community at ATC helps all of us improve the transplant industry.”

Collaborating with the transplant community

With more than 110,000 people waiting for an organ, the cumulative work of UNOS researchers highlights the importance of community collaboration in evaluating system impacts of various policy and operational changes. The work presented this year at ATC incorporated multiple stakeholders, including patients, and represented important stepping stones for future system modifications.

“The data and results compiled are a culmination of some of the work UNOS researchers have been involved with throughout the past year in support of policy development and evaluation, predictive analytics, collaborative improvement, and data science,” said UNOS assistant director of research Amber Wilk, Ph.D. “I’m so proud of our teams.”

Find the full list of UNOS researchers who presented at ATC here.
For a list of OPTN-funded research presentations at ATC, visit the OPTN website.

NOTE: Some of the studies presented at ATC were supported wholly or in part by Health Resources and Services Administration contract HHSH250-2019-00001C. The content is the responsibility of the authors alone and does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. government.

“There is so much intellectual capital assembled at UNOS to study and evaluate the transplant system and find ways to improve through research and analytics.”

Ryan Ehrensberger, Ph.D., UNOS chief growth officer

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