What happens during public comment?

UNOS convenes the community and welcomes open debate throughout the policy development process.
Public comment is a time for the donation and transplant community to come together and work collaboratively. Return here to find emerging ideas from discussion both online and in the regional meetings that will be taking place across the country.
Winter 2020 public comment opened Jan. 22 and will conclude March 24.
View all open proposals and find information about webinars here

The role of regional meetings

Regional meetings are held twice a year during the winter and late summer, and are an opportunity for everyone to provide input on proposed policy changes. Members from each region may vote, and all attendees may voice feedback or ask questions. Learn more about regional meetings and see the winter 2020 schedule.  

After the close of every public comment period, the volunteer committees of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network work to analyze the themes and concerns voiced by the community as they review proposals and continue the policy development process. Visit the OPTN public comment page to view current and past proposals.

What is public comment?

Public comment is a crucial part of policy development. It’s a time for donor families, transplant candidates, organ recipients, donation and transplant professionals and the general public to provide feedback and engage in debate about policies that govern organ matching and allocation. To make the nation’s organ donation and transplantation system fair and equitable for all, many voices are needed and every view matters.

Please see the resources listed here to learn more about how UNOS convenes the organ donation and transplant community and the public in this twice yearly forum.

“Public comment is so important. And regional meetings are the place everyone comes together to talk about the big picture. I learn from the people who are on the ground and doing the work—like transplant coordinators and administrators. It’s really important to consider their perspectives and have evidence-based conversations about policy. Public comment is a reflection opportunity for real world issues in transplant.”

Macey L. Henderson, JD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Dr. Henderson serves on the OPTN Board of Directors. She is also a living donor.

Voices in Transplant

Hear perspectives from the organ donation and transplant community in our blog.

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