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Technology for transplants

Powering lifesaving decisions

UNetSM is the technology used by organ donation and transplant professionals every day to save lives through transplantation. United Network for Organ Sharing is the non-profit organization that built and continuously improves UNet in partnership with innovative technology tools and partners.

When a doctor determines that a patient needs an organ transplant, they will be listed and begin a journey that will continue for the rest of their life. UNOS’ technology enables many steps along the transplant journey. The visual and timeline below show the journey of two people: the person in need of a transplant and the organ donor. It also reveals the applications and technologies that enable our national system to save lives every day.

A solid foundation

Partnering with industry leaders, UNet is the secure network, matching the right organ with the right patient at the right time. 24/7.

The transplant journey and technology that powers it

icon of person, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Needs transplant

icon of hourglass, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Waiting

icon of person, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Death declared or imminent

icon of hand holding heart, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.

Becomes donor

icon of person, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Needs transplant

icon of hourglass, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Waiting

icon of gear wheel, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Match run

icon of person, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Death declared or imminent

icon of heart with addition sign, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Referred

icon of hand holding a heart, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Becomes donor

icon of heart with lines to show movement, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Offer sent

icon of magnifying glass with checkmark, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Offer evaluated, accepted

icon of heart with addition sign, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Organ recovered

icon of hand holding organ transport container, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Organ transported

icon of two people connected by line with arrow moving from donor to recipient, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Transplant

icon of graph with arrow pointing up, part of Transplant process diagram © United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.Post-transplant data

© 2021 United Network for Organ Sharing. All rights reserved.

Using Waitlist, a transplant program adds candidates to the national waiting list and manages their health data. Waitlist is built with technology tools and partners to ensure security, reliability and speed.

blue circle with line icon of kidney
A patient listed

Pat’s doctor determines that they need a new liver. Transplant hospital lists Pat using Waitlist.

Using DonorNet, an organ procurement organization (OPO) adds health data for an organ donor. DonorNet supports OPO coordinators whose casework requires traveling to different hospitals.

A donor identified

Jamie registered as an organ donor before their death. An OPO enters Jamie’s health data in DonorNet.

OPOs use DonorNet to perform a match run—matching each unique organ to the best-suited candidates, and sending automated organ offers to transplant surgeons for acceptance or refusal.

Innovative technology to save even more lives

Match run

Jamie’s donor data is used to make a match run—a unique list of potential transplant candidates for each organ.

Offer sent and evaluated

Pat’s transplant surgeon receives offer for Jamie’s liver. Using UNet Image Sharing, they review images of donor liver in order to make best decision for Pat.

To ensure organs are matched correctly and efficiently with the recipient, OPOs use TransNet for organ packaging and labeling.

Organ transported

When the donated liver has been recovered, the OPO uses TransNet to automate organ packaging and labeling.

100% increase

Over the last 25 years, we have doubled the number of organ transplants performed in the U.S.

More than 39,000 lives saved through transplant in 2020 and an all-time high for most lives saved by deceased organ donors.

Transplanted

While UNOS technology does not directly touch the organ transplant, this is what motivates our work—to equitably increase transplants.

Data collection for donor, candidate and recipient-specific records creating robust understanding of organ donation and transplantation.

Using this collected data, UNOS provides a suite of data and research analytic services to its members to help them make decisions, meet regulatory requirements, and implement successful quality assurance and performance improvement initiatives.

Post-transplant data

Using TIEDI, Pat’s transplant team will monitor and submit their patient’s health data, enabling UNOS data scientists and transplant professionals to continuously improve the system.

Proudly built with

Collaboration

UNOS partners with the community and with innovative technology companies to continuously improve the proprietary, secure, online-based systems involved in placing donated organs efficiently. These partnerships also support the collection of essential data that help improve the national system and increase the number of transplants.

UNOS works collaboratively with the community and technology innovators to increase system performance. And as a data-driven organization UNOS researchers test and innovate to increase efficiencies—enabling all parts of the organ donation and transplant community to thrive and to save even more lives.

David Axelrod, M.D.

“Using the new DonorNet Mobile has really helped us navigate this more difficult, more complex environment in which we find ourselves.”

David Axelrod, M.D., University of Iowa Health Care transplant surgeon

Jacob Mansy

“The UNOS IT team had immediate responses to any of the feedback I gave them.”

Jacob Mansy, surgical physician assistant at Scripps Green Hospital

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