Liver distribution policy targeted for April 30 implementation

Liver distribution policy targeted for April 30 implementation

Updated implementation date: May 14 (see 4/24 news item)

The new liver distribution system based on acuity circles is scheduled for implementation April 30, 2019. The policy, approved by the OPTN/UNOS Board of Directors in December 2018, replaces donation service area (DSA) and regional boundaries with consistent geographic distribution units based on a combination of candidates’ level of medical urgency and the relative distance from donor to transplant hospitals.

SRTR modeling of the new system suggests it will:

  • Reduce pre-transplant deaths
  • Increase transplant rates for pediatric recipients
  • Reduce geographic variation in MELD scores at transplant

The National Liver Review Board (NLRB) implementation is also scheduled for implementation on April 30. Resources to help you prepare for both liver distribution and NLRB implementation are available on the OPTN website.  In addition, various training modules and resources are available in UNOS Connect under the Liver category of offerings.

For questions or further information

If you’d like to know more about existing policies, please visit the Liver and Intestinal Organ Transplantation Committee’s page on the OPTN website send an email to member.questions@unos.org.  If you’d like to know more about projects or proposals our committee continues to discuss, contact your regional representative to the committee or send an e-mail to liver@unos.org.

Learn more about the new liver system and how it will benefit patients here.

COVID-19 update: Jan. 21, 2021

COVID-19 update: Jan. 21, 2021

New requirements for COVID-19 testing data collection in DonorNet, emergency policy actions remain in effect, amnesty summary report available, and public comment open

National Donor Memorial Award for Excellence 2021

National Donor Memorial Award for Excellence 2021

Nominees are volunteers— often donor parents, recipients, living donors or donor family members— who have gone “above and beyond” in promoting organ donation and transplantation with little public recognition.

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